A person can be said to act intelligently in any given environment whenever he or she satisfactorily solves the problems of that environment.

LAW OF INTELLIGENT ACTION

When a person is confronted with a problem, the intelligence of his or her action is dependent on three primary factors:
1.           Ones desire to solve the problem,
2.     Ones ability to solve it,
3.          Ones capc~city for handling the human relations involved.

RULES FOR STRAIGHT THINKING

I.            RULES FOR MAKING PRECISE OBSERVATIONS
Rule 1. Define the primary facts in connection with your observation, and separate these facts from any opinions or impressions.
Rule 2. Analyze the facts, as far as they will permit, from the standpoint of what, when where, and who

II.            RULES FOR DEFINING THE REAL PROBLEM AND CONSIDERING POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS.
Rule 3. Construct a precise and analytical definition of the real problem from the stand point of what, when, where, and who
Rule 4. Keeping the total situation in mind, list all possible solutions that suggest themselves.
Rule 5. Classify these splutions in order of preference.
Rule 6. Select the most promising solutions for further examination.

III.            RULES FOR SECURING EVIDENCE ON POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS
Rule 7. Expose yourself to sources of evidence on all sides of the
question, rather than find evidence only on one side.
Rule 8. Appraise the validity of your evidence from the standpoint of its source and the means used for gathering it.
Rule 9. Guard against the formation of opinions or premature judgements while in the process of evidence.
Rule 10. Keep the mind open and hospitable to new evidence on any side of the question..

IV.            RULES FOR DRAWING CONCLUSIONS
Rule 11. Set up a balance sheet on each possible solution, stating
your evidence for and against that course of action.
Rule 12. Weigh the relative importance of positive and negative evidence in each case, and draw you conclusion in favor of the best course (or courses) of action to be taken.